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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been adding a few things to my truck and decided to start a build thread to document the progress. This community has provided a lot of valuable info on the F150 Raptor and perhaps, this build thread will provide some “giving back” to the community by helping fellow raptor owners decide if some of these mods are for them – or not. In the process, I will attempt to provide some feedback on the performance of the mods and the vendors that provided the equipment.

First a coule of pics to show how the truck looks today (after the mods). After the pics is the Table of Contents, that will help you find a topic that may interest you more quickly.

Pic 1:




Pic 2:



Pic 3:



Pic 4:



Pic 5:




TABLE of CONTENTS:

Page 1:
Post 1: Stainless Works long tube headers and true dual exhaust (high flow cats/ x pipe).
Post 2: Cold Air Intake (AFE)
Post 3: Rigid D2s and Light bars
Post 4: Console Vault
Post 5: Line X Bed and Wheel Wells
Post 6: Wicked Performance Front and Rear Bumpers
Post 7: CO2 System
Post 8: BAK FLIP F1 (Bed Cover)
Post 9: Tuffy Lock Box

Page 2:
Post 11: Pros/Cons of CO2 vs on-board compressor
Post 15: SVT Certificate
Post 17: RPG Tie Rods
Post 18: King 3.0 Coilovers

Page 3:
Post 22: King 3.0 Rear Bypasses
Post 23: Photos of Cleaned up Raptor w/ Kings
Post 25: Adjusting the King 3.0s
Post 26: RPG Upper Control Arms (UCAs)
Post 28: Travel Distance with Kings/UCAs, etc.

Page 4:
Post 31: Subdued American Flag
Post 32: Mag-Hytec Rear Differential Cover
Post 34: Method Double Standard Wheels
Post 36: RPG Stage 3 (Bump stops, Frame Wraps, National Springs)
Post 37: King 3.0 Setup; Pros/Cons Discussion

Page 5:
Post 44: RPG Stage 3 Install
Post 48: National Springs

Page 6:
Post 55: Bump Stop Comparisons
Post 60: Removing rust from underneath Truck/ Repainting

Page 7:
Post 61: CO2/N2 discussion
Post 70: Replacing OE Battery

Page 8:
Post 71: Off Topic: Ford Ranger Cylinder Head Gasket Repair
Post 72: SW "under the bumper" exhaust setup/ Blackening the tips
Post 80: Discussion on transmission temperature

Page 9:
Post 88: DC Power Engineering 270 amp alternator
Post 89: Power Management Setup for Dual (Aux) Battery


Page 10:
Post 92: AFE hose clamps
Post 93: Rear Brake Rotors and Pads Upgrade

Page 11:
Post 108: Front Brake Rotors and Pads Upgrade
Post 109: New Brake Bed-in Procedures

Page 12:
Post 113: Bleeding the Brakes and Brake Fluid Replacement
Post 114: Dual Battery Cabling and Connections
Post 119: Retrofit HIDs (Ducati Lights) w/ LED rings

Page 13:
Post 123: RPG Power Steering Reservoir
Post 130: Billet Ford Oval for Tailgate and Tinting 3rd Brake Light

Page 14:
Post 132: Test Fitting Aux Battery Box in Bed
Post 137: Installing CO2 tank on Tire Rack

Page 15:
Post 149: Evaluating options for additional rocker switches

Page 16:
Post 151, 160: 6 Rocker Switch Panel Installed, Rigid D2s on Bed Rack, N2 Cylinder on Bed Rack

More to follow as I continue to catalogue the build....

Not in any particular order with respect to what was done first or last, thought I will start off with the Stainless Works long tube headers and true dual exhaust (high flow cats/ x pipe). I opted for the chambered mufflers, not the S tube mufflers. In theory, by going with the chambered mufflers, one leaves a bit of HP on the table, but I was concerned with potential drone and overall loudness of the less restrictive S tubes. The chambered muffler is mellow at idle and cruising speeds, but opens up pretty good when you accelerate.

Example of chambered muffler:



Example of S tube muffler:



Why long tubes: At the low to mid end, the best way to maximize exhaust scavenging, thus helping to maximize the engine's volumetric efficiency is to move the exhaust out of the engine as fast as possible. Long tubes work best for this because the length allows an elongated path for the gas to flow, thus allowing the gas to leave the cylinder with more speed because the gas has more time to gain velocity before it hits the collector.

By now, it should not be a surprise to anyone that installing this setup on a Raptor is a royal PITA. It took about 2 days (22 hours) to install this setup on my truck. It did not help that I managed to bend the oil dipstick tube in the process and ended up having to order a new one. All in all, it is a not an easy install. For consideration, some things you must do to install the long tube headers: Remove the engine skid plates, skid plate on left side of transmission cross member, the transmission cross member, starter, move the steering shaft out of the way, remove nuts/bolts from right motor mount (you have to lift the motor), move oil dipstick tube/dipstick, etc., etc.

Pic of the headers, high flow cats, x-pipe:



Pic of the chambered mufflers, pipes and tips:



I have read of issues with the header bolts that SW provides with the headers (wrong threads). I did not experience this. The bolts fit OK. In defense of SW with respect to level of install difficulty, IMO any long tube header, no matter the brand, will be difficult to install on this truck. Yet, the time and effort was worth it. The truck has increased performance (HP) and although I did not install headers/dual exhaust to increase mileage, I have noticed a slight (~ 2 MPG) increase (per onboard MPG tracker).

With the headers and high flow cats, I was expecting a CEL issue after the install. To my surprise, the truck has not even blinked with respect to CELs. Each truck is different, so in some cases, a CEL issue will develop after the install. If so, a tune is needed to eliminate the CEL. I suspect the tune cuts off the O2 sensors. I have driven the truck x100 miles since the install – no issues yet. The exhaust sounds great - brings the beast to life, but yet muzzles it just enough to keep it somewhat civilized in the burg. Some of the dyno graphs on the SW header /exhaust install indicates an ~ inc of 25 HP (bit conservative IMO).

I would have preferred black tips instead of the chrome, but SW does not offer that option. I am looking for some black tips to finish the exhaust (considering RBP). Another consideration I learned after the fact is that you can get the pipes ceramic coated at an additional cost.

Drone? Up front, I have not noticed a drone. It is noticeably louder in and out of the cabin, but I expected that. I like “hearing the engine” respond. If you like it dead quite in the cabin, this setup isn’t for you. But, neither is it so loud that you cannot have a conversation or do what you would normally do with the radio/speaker system. FWIW, I have checked out a number of videos/sound clips of the SW system posted on the web. They help discern some differences between setups (chambered vs. stock, etc.), but none really do the sound quality/level justice. Most clips make the setup “sound louder” than it actually is.

It is difficult to get pics of the headers after they are installed (another indication of how deep they are buried in the engine compartment and inherent problems on installation). But, here are a few of the system:

Pic 1:



Pic 2:



Pic 3:



Pic 4:



Pic 5:



Overall synopsis:

Headers/Exhaust:

Pros:
1 - Quality materials and construction
2 - Good design/fit to truck
3 - Performance increase
4 – Good balance between loudness and performance
5 – longer life span of exhaust set up.

Cons:
1 – PITA to install (probably common to all long tube headers). Get ready to invent a few new curse words.
2 – Cost; this is not a cheap mod, especially if you buy a programmer/tune and have to pay someone to do the install
3 – No option for black tips and only one exhaust routing option (where stock exhaust exits behind passenger side rear tire).

And, just in case you are interested in what the stock manifolds look like:



More to follow.......:smileup:
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Ok, continuing the build saga. I figured since I increased the exhale capability of the 6.2, the next step would be to do something with the stock intake. The principle behind a cold air intake (CAI) is that cooler air has a higher density, thus containing more oxygen per volume unit than warmer air. Hence, fuel burns at a more efficient mixture. In theory, you get more power out of fuel when it's combined with the right amount of air. Some will say the Raptor comes with a stock CAI, which I believe is true. Some benefits of the CAI: longer block life, faster throttle response, increased HP, better gas mileage (provided you contain the speed demon), and reusable filters.



Most, if not all of the bolt-on, after market intakes for the raptor are categorized at CAIs. So, essentially we are replacing the stock CAI with another CAI, the primary advantage comes from increasing the air flow by using an intake pipe that has fewer bends than the stock system. The result is a higher volume of air that flows more freely, filling the combustion chamber with more oxygen molecules for igniting fuel at balanced, efficient mixtures that maximize power.

I decided on the Advanced Flow Engineering (aFe) stage 2 intake, for no other reason that it has a covered box and a large intake tube with few restrictions. This intake has received mostly positive reviews on the forum and looks pretty good on the truck with the black aluminum intake tube and polished aFe logo. 5 Star Tune offers colored matched intake tubes (orange, blue, silver, and black) to go w/ your truck color. Personally, not a fan of color-matched add-ons in the engine compartment, but it’s an option. It is advertised to produce 18hp, 22lb.-ft. of torque and outflow the factory intake by 47%. You can get three different filters from aFe: two oiled versions (one advertised for hwy and one for dusty conditions) and one dry filter. The complete install took only about 40 minutes and only because I took my time. It was easy and a relief after the exhaust install. The only design flaw I see worth noting on this setup is that the filter does not seat completely flush with the round plastic adaptor. It gives the appearance that the filter element is not completely sealed (via the clamp) onto the adaptor, when it actually is sealed.

Pic 1:



Pic 2:



Pic 3:



Still amazed the truck is running great with the Headers/exhaust and now aFe intake and still NO tune or CELs. I had read that just with the modified intake, some trucks would hesitate on shifting or taking gas and in some cases, actually lose power, but thus far, not a problem. The truck is running great, picked up HP and shows no hesitation.

BTW: I do have an SCT X3 power flash with 3 programs standing by…

aFe intake:

Pro's:
1 - Quality CAI with great fit and finish for the most part
2 - Great OEM integration with MAF
3 - Good resulting performance

Con's:
1 – Would expect better fit between filter element and mounting flange it clamps to
3 - Includes sealer strip that is not needed w/ the lid install - could confuse some installers (picky I know)

Overall, at this point, would buy it again. :smiley_thumbs_up:
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Rigid D2s and Light Bars:

I got hooked on these after reading all of the forum and other internet reviews on Rigid light bars. I considered the Ford light bar and conventional round high intensity lights for a while, but decided against the big honking “round” lights and went with the big honking bars.

My initial setup was:

D2s for the openings in the front bumper and a 20” E- series LED bar for the lower grill mount. For the dually set up, I had an amber flood to the outside and a white driving D2 on each side. I did not realize it when I purchased the 20” bar, but it comes configured with driving and floods (unless you tell them to make it differently). Another lesson learned is that it is best to configure the bars the way you want i.e. you can have a mix of amber and white and flood and drive all on the same bar. It costs just a bit more, but it is worth it (IMO). You will need to tell Rigid or the retail shop how you want it configured and controlled. Also, it is worth it to check prices on Rigid lights, I found better prices going through a retail shop than going directly to Rigid for purchases. The downside is it injects a “middleman” in case you have issues with the lights, etc.



and,



The ambers are not the “old school” fog light yellow light. These ambers are more akin to amber hued driving lights vs pure fog lights. In the photo above, the amber is on the left or to the outside. There are technical differences between true fog lights and driving lights, suffices to say here, none of these Rigid lights that I have seen are true fog lights. Since there isn’t a lot of fog around where I live, I cannot vouch how these ambers would do in foggy conditions. However, they do cast a wicked beam and blaze a trail.

I had a couple of issues with the dually setup.

1. The white D2s would slightly flicker (reminded me of a timing light). I returned the defective lights to Rigid and they sent me a different set. After searching the forum, I discovered a few others had some initial issues with flickering LEDs. I believe Rigid has corrected this problem. To date, I have no other issues with flickering lights.

2. The other issue with the dually set up is that one mounting plate (driver’s side) did not fit in the bumper opening. The passenger side fit great. See photo below:



and,



I finally took some measurements of the bumper in relation to the grill and other things and discovered the front bumper came misaligned from the factory. After I leveled the bumper, the mounting plate fit OK and there was sufficient clearance to mount the D2s.

3. Now, for the last issue with the dually set up, Rigid provides self-tapping screws to mount the dually plate. The weight of the D2s (and plate) are hanging on these pitiful self-tapping screws, which quite frankly don’t have enough bite to keep them secure on pavement, let alone rough conditions. I changed them out for stainless bolts/nuts/washers.

Change 2:

After I changed my bumpers, I moved the white D2s from the dually set up to the rear bumper and moved the D2 ambers and 20” bar to my new front bumper.



Rear,



I finally put the 40” bar on the bumper and the last configuration looks like this:



The D2 ambers and ambers on the outer ends of the 40” bar are on one aux switch. The 20” bar is on another, the white driving and floods in the center of the 40” bar are on another switch and the white D2s on the rear bumper are on the last aux switch.

Now, for the Pros/Cons:

Pros:

1 – Despite the initial flicker problem and poor quality mounting hardware for the Duallys, I believe the overall quality of the Rigid LIGHTS are good. In my experience, the lights are very durable. Although I have heard of condensation and water issues with some folks, I have yet to experience any issues.

2 – The light output is insane, especially considering the relatively low amps being pulled. The D2s alone will put out more light than the stock headlights.

3 – Made in the USA and the Rigid customer service is great.

Cons:

1 - As indicated, the dually mounting hardware needs improving.

2 - The instructions could use clarity and improvement. The B&W photos are poor. I think I got a copy of a copy of a copy.

3 - They do not come with an effective theft deterrent or locking mechanism to keep them on the truck. This is especially true for those running the bars exposed on bumpers. I ordered the locking tabs (sold by Rigid) to help deter theft, but my sense is they are worthless. I can remove the bar in about 2 minutes and put it in the truck, but it is a hassle to put back on and realign. I encourage Rigid and or the bumper makers out there to incorporate a locking mechanism to keep these expensive lights from walking away. Some folks have considered spot welding as a solution….i.e. once the bar is in position, tack it at the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Console Vault

Console Vault:

Changing the performance mod pace a bit, thought I would mention the console vault. I had previously talked about changing the bumpers and I will get back to that subject. This is a product that fits into the existing truck console and offers a little peace of mind if you need to leave valuables in the truck. I bought it primarily for weapons, but it could come in handy for other things.

I was somewhat skeptical of the fit/quality of the product, but decided to give it a try. However, without doubt, it is one of the best mods/purchases I have made for the truck. It fits in the existing console perfectly and the quality/finish of construction is top notch. The company offers a barrel or combo lock. I opted for the combo lock as I did not want an additional key to keep up with.

There is no drilling or cutting required and it takes only about 20 minutes (including reading the instructions, etc.,) to install it.

Pic 1:



Pic 2:



Pic 3:



Pic 4:




Overall synopsis:

Console Vault:

Pros:

1 - Quality materials and construction (12 gauge steel)

2 - Good design/fit to truck – no modifications required to vehicle’s console. Original console opens/closes just as it normally would.

3 - Easy and quick to install

4 - Some peace of mind if you are handling weapons – nothing is completely theft proof.

5 - Made in the USA (Always a big plus in my book)

Cons:

1 – Give up a little usable space within existing console and the tray that comes in the original console cannot be used with the vault
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Line X:

From seeing how truck beds get scuffed up and eventually rusting from exposed metal, I decided to opt for Line X protection. While I had the bed done, I went ahead and had the rear fender wells sprayed as well. It comes with limited lifetime warranty (not supposed to crack, bubble, or flake for as long as you own the vehicle). I also got the premium topcoat option. For care of the liner, Line X recommends pressure washing with H2O only and to use a liquid wax.

Some pics:



Next:



Next:



Next:



Next:



:smileup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Bumpers:

I have mentioned bumpers before. Guess there needs to be some discussion on these at this point. Perhaps, a good place to start is with the stock bumpers. The rear bumper, minus the hitch assembly, weighs approximately 21 pounds and is comprised of mostly plastic and lightweight metal. I was surprised at actually how flimsy it felt after I took it off the truck. And, at a whopping 21 pnds, it is not surprising how the least little tap on the ends (not center where the hitch is) will easily bend the bumper into the rear quarter panels. Mounted to the hitch and attached to the truck, it appears to have more structural integrity and probably does, but nonetheless, it is still quite weak from an impact perspective (IMO). The rear bumper on the Raptor looks about the same as many other stock F150 pickups. I would guess they are interchangeable. Up front, about the only thing that provides any strength to the rear bumper is the integration of the hitch assembly.

I always thought the purpose of a bumper was to protect the vehicle, so that in low speed accidents, no material damage would be sustained by the major structural components of the vehicle. Just out of curiosity, a quick search of bumper regulations turned up a lot of info on fed regs regarding bumpers. The tolerance seems pretty low…one of the recent fed regs I found indicates no major structural damage should occur at a speed of 2.5 miles per hr. Purpose here is not to harp on regs, etc, but to just point out the rear stock bumper seems pretty weak.

The stock front bumper seems considerably stronger than the rear bumper with respect to weight and thickness of the metal and how it is constructed. The stock front bumper weighs approx. 45 pds.

Here are some pics of the stock set up:

OE Rear 1:



OE Rear 2:



OE Front 1:



OE Front 2:



Many folks have questioned why there are two relatively large openings on each side in the front stock bumper. I have read what I consider supposition on requirements for airflow, which I have some trouble accepting. Many that don’t like the empty openings have opted to put lights there, with apparently no ill consequences. So, other than speculation, not sure why the front bumper has the two openings.

In doing some research on bumpers for the Raptor, I came across the build site of a fellow forum member, RaptorFTW. I liked the bumpers he had made and opted to get the same thing. The bumpers were made by Wicked Performance (Site Vendor). Unfortunately, they can no longer cut SVT or FORD logos into the skid/bumper components, but they can do about anything else (as long as there are no copyright issues).

EDIT: Unfortunately, Wicked Performance no longer makes bumpers for Raptors.

Replacing the rear bumper with the Wicked bumper takes about 1.5 hours, provided you have the tools to cut the dust cover (thin metal plate that runs above the hitch). I have a metal cutting wheel for my grinder and zipped thru it pretty quick. The reason you have to take the metal dust cover off is to allow the new rear bumper to set as close to the hitch assembly as possible. The removal doesn’t affect the hitch. The stock license plate lights fit nicely into the light holes in the new bumper. I changed the bulbs out to blue LEDs while I had them out.

Once the hitch is mounted to the new Wicked bumper, it becomes a fairly heavy assembly. I managed to lift it up and get it bolted to the truck without help, but it is best to have some help with this. The color I opted for was the closest thing they have to matching the stock flares. The bumper is powder coated and the fit, finish, welds and material all look great. As you can see from the pics below, I had Tim cut the holes for the D2s in the rear bumper. These are wired to the #4 aux switch and work well. If you are backing a boat or hitching up to something in low light, they help a lot. However, they will wash out the rear view camera.

Pic 1:



Pic 2:



Pic 3:



I had Tim cut in a military unit affiliation symbol in my front skid plate (since we can’t get the SVT logo anymore). The dagger and crossed arrows came out pretty good and definitely personalizes the ride some. The aluminum backing plate that was provided had to be taken out since it interfered with the 20 inch light bar. Basically, I could not aim the bar correctly with the provided aluminum backing plate, so I opted for a thinner plate. I am tempted to take the plate completely out and just leave the cutout open. The other option I was considering was putting in a light behind the cutout.



Skid Plate:



Overall, the bumper and skid plate took about 1.5 hours to install. I found it easier than the rear due to not having to mess with cutting the hitch assembly.



And another,



Pro's:

1 - Quality construction with good fit and finish, supplied mounting hardware is high quality

2 – Bumper color matches stock colors

3 - Wicked Perf. will work with you to fabricate what you want – to the best of their ability (lights, cutouts, etc.) Customer service is absolutely top notch.

4 – Superior to stock bumpers on strength, durability and handling impacts (my personal opinion).

Con's:

1 – The turn-around time with these bumpers can be quite extensive. Depending on how you want it customized, it can take up to 2 months or more.

2 – Backing plate behind logo cutout interfered with light bar installation. Offsetting the cutout by just ½ inch would have prevented this.

3 – I like every aspect of the overall look of the bumpers, minus two things: still not crazy about the side profile. This is inherent with these style pre-runner bumpers and is not a reflection on Wicked. The second issue is something I mentioned under an earlier lighting discussion. There is effectively no way to lock the light bars into these bumpers. It is simply loosen two 10mm nuts, unplug/cut the wires and off it comes.

Overall, would buy it again – if in the market for pre-runner bumper…
Since buying these bumpers, several vendors (on the forum) have come out with new, bumper designs. I am half tempted to get one of the newer designs that more closely hug the curve of the front of the truck, eliminate the 40 inch bar on the bumper and put it behind the grill.

Something else to consider……:smileup:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
CO2 System:

This has come in handy a few times already. Some things to be aware of, the mfg states the system was designed for use when the cylinder is sitting on its base and upright. It may be stored on its side or in any other position when not in use. You can buy a bracket for the tank to mount it. It comes with a 150 psi static regulator, so any air tool you use must have a max. rating of 150 psi or greater. The actual usable pressure at the tool end of the coil hose is about 120 psi.

Some things to consider on a CO2 system: The CO2 cylinders are required to have a hydrostatic test/born date stamp on the cylinder. The cylinders require a new hydro test every 5 years. Welding Supply Companies will not refill a cylinder that is out of tolerance (past inspection window). However, most CO2 suppliers do offer hydrostatic testing for an additional fee.

Also, other than some fancy paint on some of the CO2 cylinders, perhaps some powder coating on some, etc., there is nothing super special about a CO2 tank. By putting in some time looking for separate components (Aluminum CO2 cylinder, regular, hose, etc) one could save quite a few bucks by putting together their own system.

Conducting a search for off road CO2 systems or portable CO2 systems will turn up a few sources to gather additional data. Look for quality brass fittings and a coil hose long enough to reach your tires, if you want to keep the cylinder mounted to the truck. The setup in the pics is just temporary for now. However, I did discover that by putting it in the center of the truck, I could reach all four tires without moving anything.



Another,

 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
BAK FLIP F1:

Pic 1:



Pic 2:



Pic 3:



BTW, the Tuxedo Black "gold speck" is highlighted well in that first pic.
The BakFlip is available in three models, the G2, HD, and F1. All three models are exactly the same except for the materials used for the panels:

G2 covers are made from aluminum sandwich panels. These panels are laminated with aluminum sheets over a core made from EPS, which makes the panels extremely strong yet lightweight. The panels are also insulated, making them noise resistant and allowing the truck bed to be cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The G2 cover weighs approx. 60 lbs and can support over 200 lbs of weight.

HD panels are constructed from all aircraft-grade aluminum. Aluminum is 50% stronger and up to 10% lighter than the ABS laminated G2 panel material. This makes the BakFlip HD panels much stronger and even easier to handle than the G2. HD panels feature a baked-on powder coat. The HD cover weighs approx.. 55lbs and can support about 300 lbs of weight.

F1 covers are built from a fiberglass-reinforced polymer, with an aluminum underside panel. BakFlip touts the F1 as the strongest and lightest of the BakFlip covers. The aircraft-grade aluminum frames and hardware provide strength, less weight, and easy handling. The BakFlip F1 stays cooler to the touch and is UV-protected for superior resistance to cracking and fading. The F1 cover weighs approx. 50 lbs and can support about 400 lbs of weight on top of the cover when closed.

The panels are almost an inch thick, and sit flush with the top edge of your truck bed rails.

Installation: It took about 45 minutes to install the BakFlip. There is no need to drill any holes into the truck. The cover is installed using a rail system. This rail system is clamped to the truck bed by specially designed clamps that grip behind the truck bed rails and sandwich the BakFlip rails in position.

There are 2 drain hoses in the front of each rail that funnel water that’s collected in the rail system out of the bed. BakFlip claims that about 99% of trucks are raised at the back and lower at the front end. Therefore, they say the drain tubes are positioned at the far front corners of the bed to ensure that they work optimally.

Pro's:

1 – Thus far, no leaks from rain.

2 – Seems to be fairly well constructed and has held up to the Florida sun. BakFlip claims it does well with ice and snow, can’t vouch for that (yet).

3 – Easy to install with no drilling required.

4 – Light weight and easy to remove if you need an open bed for cargo.

Con's:

1 – The clamps that hold the rails to the truck are OK, but need to be checked frequently to ensure they have not loosened. Overall the clamps seem to work, but the clamp design still needs some work (IMO).

2 – When attaching the cover to the rails, the instructions state not to over tighten the star knobs. There is a reason for this – if you over tighten, you will compress the panel and make a permanent indention. These attachment points need strengthening.


The good news is that BakFlip has developed a box that works with the cover:




Another,

 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The King Coilover install is on hold for now, pending some replacement parts from King. Hope to have these back within a week or so.

However, here is something some of you might have been thinking about, the Tuffy Rear Seat Lockbox.



It is secured to the truck by way of a bracket that installs on one of the rear seat posts and the existing jack mounting plate.



And,



Lid Closed:



Seat Down:



This only took a few minutes to install and provides just a little more in-cab storage. Like the console vault, you can get a combo lock instead of a key if you prefer (cost about $20.00 more). There are also different versions, depending on if you have a SCREW or SCAB.

Pro's:
1 – Pretty good construction (16 gauge steel, powder coat finish, weather seals)
2 – Design is built around OEM jack – no drilling required
3 – Takes advantage of existing (wasted) space under the rear seat to secure gear
4 – Does offer some additional security via the lock and is somewhat hidden from view

Con's:
1 – After the OEM jack is put inside the box, the space savings is not huge on the SCAB version – don’t expect to throw your whole tool box in. The claim is 2075 cubic inches of lockable storage space, but throw in a tow strap, couple of shackles, cargo straps and few other things and it is quickly filled. For me, the cost was worth clearing up some of my gear clutter.
2 – Might interfere with some floor mats
 

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Great write up, thanks. Would you mind sharing your thoughts on this setup vs. an on-board compressor? For example, Assuming the tank was pressurized to max, guessing it is the same 150PSI, how many Raptor tires could you pressurize to normal street pressure (40PSI) from Offroad pressure of say 20PSI?

I used a crappy little compressor from emergency battery setup and it took about 45 minutes to air up. I know that a good mounted compressor will work much faster, but it weighs more. I have a commercial tank at work that can fill 150PSI no sweat.

How much did your set up run?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Great write up, thanks. Would you mind sharing your thoughts on this setup vs. an on-board compressor? For example, Assuming the tank was pressurized to max, guessing it is the same 150PSI, how many Raptor tires could you pressurize to normal street pressure (40PSI) from Offroad pressure of say 20PSI?

I used a crappy little compressor from emergency battery setup and it took about 45 minutes to air up. I know that a good mounted compressor will work much faster, but it weighs more. I have a commercial tank at work that can fill 150PSI no sweat.

How much did your set up run?
Thanks E63,

There are advantages and disadvantages to on board air (OBA) and CO2. One of the big advantages is I can air up a tire in about 2 minutes vs about 5-6 minutes with a good quality OBA system. Some will say space is an issue, but most decent OBA systems require a tank and the complexity of the OBA with all the parts and mounting issues made it a fairly easy decision for me. Not sure how many tires you could fill from trail to hwy pressure, but I have heard some guys claiming upwards of about 30. It depends on several variables: what size tank you have and how much you crank in each one. Unless you are having a real bad day, one fill will get you out of a lot of jams. My system CO2 system ran about $ 270.00

CO2:

Pros: Portable, use for tires, tools, setting beads, etc., install is very simple

Cons: You will eventually run out, pay to refill



OBA:

Pros: Free after install, unlimited supply, many uses

Cons: Stationary, more effort on the install, will take more time to fill each tire, potential compressor failures/leaks (more moving parts that can break)

Of course, many of the warhorses will say the best way to go is to have both: OBA and CO2. This would be hard to argue with, but space and $ do come into play.
 

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Cons: You will eventually run out, pay to refill

Thanks so much for taking the time to explain. So I take it these OBA tanks get filled to a much higher pressure than what my Industrial 3 stroke compressor can dish out? What do places charge to air them up?
 

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I have a Powertank Co2 system on my Jeep. It is a 15 pound tank and I can take my four 38x15.50x15 from 6 lbs. to 35 lbs. about 6-7 times with no problems. It will easily last me a full week in Moab airing up and down, changing tires with an air wrench, seating beads and blowing all the dust and dirt off everyone. I also have one of the paint ball sized 30oz tank on my race Rhino and it will fill four tires from flat to full with no problems. They have plenty for the weekend warrior.
Just to add to your list:

Con for Co2, you have to weigh the tank to know just how much you really have but you have full pressure until it is almost gone.

Con to Co2, they do not work well when they are real cold. The hotter the better

Co2 will freeze your seals in your air gun if you use it to long. I found a synthetic air tool oil made by RedLine that keeps this problem at bay.

Pro for Co2, quite ,no brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr all day long.

Pro for Co2, you don't need power, most my buddies with the on board air can't fill all their tires without the Jeep running.

One more thing I have fell in love with is the new Snap On cordless impact wrench. It rocks and saves air. I don't even use the air wrench any more. Pricey, but worth every penny.
 

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Thanks everyone for helping out a newbie to these things. For others not in the know I found this info useful from another site that answered my previous unanswered question...:

The Power Tank CO2 system uses compressed CO2 as a source of onboard air. Pressurized CO2 can be used just like compressed air to fill tires, operate power tools, ARB lockers, etc on the trail or anywhere else. We like to use ours on wrecking yard and other vehicle recovery trips so that we can run power tools where we normally could not.

Since compressed CO2 is stored as a liquid, a relatively small tank can store a large amount of high pressure gas. For example a PT-10 CO2 tank will air up 40 33x12.50 tires from 10-25 psi! The Power Tank can be filled at any welding or fire extinguisher supply shop.

The Power Tank is a high pressure, DOT rated, (3000psi) rated 6061 aluminum tank. Since liquid CO2 is normally at 1000psi or less there is no danger of rupture. The regulator is a high quality 2 stage regulator that allows you to monitor the pressure in the tank and the outlet pressure to your air hose. The Power Tank is available in 3 sizes, 5 lb, 10 lb, and 15 lb. We use the 10 lb. Friends with 44's tend to like the 15 lb tanks. All tanks come with the hose, handle and regulator.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
SVT Certificate:

I bought the Ford SVT Certificate that identifies the Raptor as a limited edition build. I asked Clay (ESAD) to see if he could make a decal of the certificate so I could place it in the truck. I thought it turned out great and it fits perfectly below the passenger side air vent. The photo makes it look larger than life (the decal is only 4” wide by 3” tall). Photo is not the best, but gives you the idea. Thanks Clay !



:smileup:
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Well, thought I would start on my Raptor Performance Group (RPG) Tie Rods today. Seemed like a fairly easy project. RPG has a pretty good video on their site that explains the install. This write up provides a few more points that you may want to consider on the installation. Couple of pics of the stock set up:



and,



Before you get started on this, couple of points to consider. You will need a 14mm allen drive socket and a torque wrench that can handle at least 100 ft/pds. Make sure your torque wrench connects to the 14mm allen. Only reason I mention this is 14mm allen sockets are not in everyone’s tool box. I found a set of 3 (12, 14, and 17 mm) at Advance Auto Parts. It's labled a hex bit set. Pic below details why you need this:



One of the first things you have to do is disconnect the knuckle end of the tie rod. I used a block of wood and tapped several times on the bottom of the tie rod - nothing. Then I used a ballpein hammer and smacked the heck out of spindle and it popped free.



To disconnect the steering box end, the video shows them using a pipe wrench, which I thought was an example of the wrong tool bit, but after fiddling with a couple of different tools, turns out the pipe wrench is the way to go. It provides just the right amount of leverage to break it free. With the OE tie rod removed, you can see where the clevis attaches to. This is where the 14mm allen head bolt threads into.



Next,



In measuring the OE tie rod, it came out at about 18.5” - same as in the RPG video. You need to measure the OE tie rod in order to set up the new tie rod. Considering the clevis is 2”, you just subtract 2” from the OE Measurement and adjust your new RPG tie rod to that distance before you install it.



Another consideration, to get the OE boot off, you have to break apart the tie rod. In some cases, this is easier said than done. I had to use a vice and whole lot of torque to break it free. Hope the other one isn’t as painful.



Some pics of the intalled RPG tie rod:




and,




Don't forget to protect the end of the tie rod when tightening. I wrapped it with a layer of duct tape.



As with many of my mods, I attempt to provide Pros/Cons for others:

Pro's:

1 – Quality good construction – Yes, it is aluminum Dorthy...

2 – Component hardware is also well made/top quality.

3 – Metal parts mate with OE truck components well (Pins/Bolts/Clevis)

Con's:

1 – Do not like the OE stock boot fit and mate to the RPG tie rod. RPG should design an aftermarket boot that is a larger diameter to appropriately fit the clevis end of their tie rod. Optimally, the boot should clamp around the steering box and on the rod itself. By using the modified OE boot and RPG tie rod, you cannot clamp it back to the rod – unless you buy a clamp (which I may end up doing). The large end of the OE boot is a little difficult to remove from the steering box – don’t think you could use the original clamp again – unless you are really careful. Perhaps, something like this will work.

View attachment 12018

Or, perhaps some zip ties (they will not rust). However, RPG should include some clamps with the tie rods if they think we should use the OE boot. However, optimally the kit needs a boot desinged to work with the new tie rod.

The clevis for the RPG tie rod is a little larger diameter than the stock tie rod end and will no doubt cause the boot to wear quicker, as there is is more rubbing against the inside of the boot. Bottom line, I will have to be watchful of boot wear and look for a better after market boot to fit the RPG clevis/tie rod.

2 – A little tube of red Loctite would be a nice addition, as it is recommended in the install video for the 14mm allen bolt that attaches the clevis to the steering box. I had some, but it never hurts to add something like that.

3 – Including paper instructions would be really nice. The video is OK, but I forgot to write down the torque values and found myself going back and forth from the computer to the garage. So, no instructions come with these. You have to look at the video.

Will provide another follow up on handling quality. And, yes - it will require an alignment after this, but will wait until I get the control arms and kings installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Well, bout time to talk about the King 3.0 Coilovers. I will cover the rear bypasses in a subsequent update. The Kings weigh about 37.6 pnds each compared to approx. 36.6 pnds for the OE set up. For a comparison pic, see below:



The driver’s side is a bit more difficult to install since you have to drill a ½ hole into the factory shock mount. King recommends temporarily bolting the upper mount onto the factory shock mount using three bolts as guide and then scoring the hole location onto the factory shock mount. Whereas the passenger side comes with the required holes to accommodate the four bolts for the upper mounting plate, the driver’s side does not.

Also, before you jack your vehicle up to start working, I recommend removing the air filter box and radiator drain reservoir. Threading the coilover reservoir up through the factory shock mount is difficult and very tedious; removing these things will help greatly.

To begin, once the wheels are removed, disconnect the tie rod. King recommends taking it loose from the spindle. As I already installed the RPG rods, I found it easier to remove it from the clevis end and to just swing out of the way.



Next, disconnect the upper ball joint from the steering knuckle (spindle).



You also need to disconnect the bolts holding the ABS line to the steering knuckle and frame.

Next, remove the sway bar bolts from the lower A-arm.



Next, loosen the lower shock bot, but do not remove. The bolt head is 27mm and the nut is 28mm. You will need an impact wrench or a breaker bar because it torqued down pretty good.



Next, remove the upper shock bolts. There are three on each side. Once the upper shock bolts are removed, it is time to remove the lower shock bolt and slide the shock out.

With the old one out, it is time to put in the King 3.0. Coilover. King recommends leaving the packing material on the reservoir until it is threaded up through the upper factory mount and in place. The reason for this is it is a tight fit going through the factory mount and you have to thread it up into the engine bay and then back down where it is mounted on the frame rails.

Before you begin, don’t forget to turn the reservoir adjuster clockwise (all the way in) and to slide the bolt plate on.



and,



It takes a fair amount of wrangling to get the reservoir up through the factory mount and back down. Wrestling with that almost 40 pnd coilover while you are threading the reservoir and attempting to keep both the reservoir and coilover from getting scratched up is a chore. On the passenger side, you have to deal with the oil dipstick and AC lines. On the driver’s side, it is the master cylinder. However, with patience, it will eventually work.

Once the coilover is in place, line up the shock in the lower A-arm and slide the blue bolt through (do not tighten yet).

Next, insert the upper shock plate on top of the factory shock mount – being careful not to damage the reservoir hose.



Install the bolt through the upper plate and the top shock mount and leave loose. Line up the bolts on the bolt plate to the holes in the factory upper mount and slide the bolt plate up into the aluminum plate.

Start the nuts onto the bolts and tighten finger tight. Tighten the single upper shock mount bolt first, and then tighten the bolt plate nuts and finally the lower shock mounting bolt. The single upper shock mount bolt is a 3/8 hex head bolt. See below for clarity:



Then, just reassemble the front end parts that were removed and check that all bolts and clamps are tight.

More to follow. Truck is still on jack stands…….
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
As a follow up to the king coilover install, if you go for this mod, ensure you check that the coilovers come w/ the required bearing spacers at the top of the shock.

See first pic below (grey background) for what it should look like w/ spacers installed. I discovered they shipped mine without the required spacers even though it had the blue zip tie attached that is supposed to hold it all together during shipping.

2nd pic (brown background) is the shock as they sent it to me (notice the zip tie, but no bearing spacers installed). These two little bearing spacers are critical to making that high priced coilover work properly. I had to ask King to send me the spacers.



2nd Pic:



I am holding off on doing the pros/cons on these so that I can keep the quality control issues from clouding my opinion of the coilovers. Still have to install the bypasses.
 

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Black Hawk
Sorry to see you are having such a hard time with the install of these shocks. I thought you might find this interesting. When I was rechecking all the bolts I found the rear shock did not feel right. I pulled it off and saw half of the spacer was missing. I missed it when I put them in because it was the side facing away from me and my buddy had fed the shock through the wheel well down to me. (I still should have caught it, but s%8# does happen)
I also am sending you a PM regarding these shocks.
 

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