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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well guys..seeing as there isn't a post up yet and i just recently performed this action to my raptor i figured i'd share some knowledge (which is very basic).

Easiest way to do it is make sure your engine is slightly warm (not hot, but warm). First water the engine bay down with just your regular garden hose. Once everything has gotten wet, give it all a good spraying of degreaser (any automotive degreaser works). Let that sit and work it's magic on everything for say 5-10 minutes. Once it's sat for the time period. Get out your good old garden hose back out and rinse your engine bay down. If you've got some heavy cake of either grease of have mud throughout your bay, i suggest getting a tire cleaning brush and scrubbing things down during your degreaser soak. You may possibly have to repeat this process a few times over. Biggest thing to look out for in doing this is not to saturate one area for too long, keep your hose moving while you are rinsing. And if you like the "shiny look" after it's clean, put some tire shine on a wax applicator pad and apply to hoses or anything plastic, just avoid your belts!

If i'm missing anything that others may do please chime in as the more we all learn the better off we are..
 

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Well guys..seeing as there isn't a post up yet and i just recently performed this action to my raptor i figured i'd share some knowledge (which is very basic).

Easiest way to do it is make sure your engine is slightly warm (not hot, but warm). First water the engine bay down with just your regular garden hose. Once everything has gotten wet, give it all a good spraying of degreaser (any automotive degreaser works). Let that sit and work it's magic on everything for say 5-10 minutes. Once it's sat for the time period. Get out your good old garden hose back out and rinse your engine bay down. If you've got some heavy cake of either grease of have mud throughout your bay, i suggest getting a tire cleaning brush and scrubbing things down during your degreaser soak. You may possibly have to repeat this process a few times over. Biggest thing to look out for in doing this is not to saturate one area for too long, keep your hose moving while you are rinsing. And if you like the "shiny look" after it's clean, put some tire shine on a wax applicator pad and apply to hoses or anything plastic, just avoid your belts!

If i'm missing anything that others may do please chime in as the more we all learn the better off we are..
A lot of people neglect the engine bay.. I have always kept mine clean like you do but, I use WD40 under the hood... Keeps it a little bit oily so anything you get on it washes of easily...
 

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Never warm the engine to spray water on it. Bad idea.

I use a power washer on very light pressure, spraying straight down, never sideways, after letting a strong degreaser soak for 5-10 mins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
evil i've always warmed it up...helps break things down slightly..when their cold everything (dirt wise) likes to stick to the textures plastics and the metal..if you get it warm (run for maybe 2 minutes) everything likes to just fall off with the water..and the stubborn comes off with degreaser...and hockster...wd-40ing can get exprensive..pick yourself up a can of tire shine...does the same and is alot cheaper, plus serves as a dual purpose for your tires :)
 

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Its a real bad idea to spray cold water on a hot surface. Especially if that surface is your engine. And never spray tire shine into your engine. It is a magnet for dust and dirt. Not to mention some of that stuff is flammable.
 

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Its a real bad idea to spray cold water on a hot surface. Especially if that surface is your engine. And never spray tire shine into your engine. It is a magnet for dust and dirt. Not to mention some of that stuff is flammable.
same with wd-40 aswell.
 

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To get an engine to look really nice you are going to need to do some scrubbing with a brush. Also if you have a cold air intake make sure to cover it up with a bag. Also a light spray with a hose will work better to blast crud off other than just pouring it over. Good dressings for engines are usually water based and therefor don't attract dirt. I personally have done engines 'warm' and never had any problems, but straight hot-off-the-dragstrip isn't the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Its a real bad idea to spray cold water on a hot surface. Especially if that surface is your engine. And never spray tire shine into your engine. It is a magnet for dust and dirt. Not to mention some of that stuff is flammable.
yes it aids attracts dirt but also aid in removing when rinsed down. It is also flammable but your engine should not reach the temperatures to create the combustion of the tire shine...or WD-40. If your engine is getting that hot..take it to the shop. There is a reason why if you go to any car shows (SEMA or any other reputable show) you always see greased up engine bays, it's tire shine people. I know cause I used to own one and have received this tip from many reputable detailing shops along with car clubs.
 

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yes it aids attracts dirt but also aid in removing when rinsed down. It is also flammable but your engine should not reach the temperatures to create the combustion of the tire shine...or WD-40. If your engine is getting that hot..take it to the shop. There is a reason why if you go to any car shows (SEMA or any other reputable show) you always see greased up engine bays, it's tire shine people. I know cause I used to own one and have received this tip from many reputable detailing shops along with car clubs.
It is tire shine. Water based tire shine. Not the stuff sprayed from a can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
should check around...meguires "hot shine" out of an aerosol can is a big hit for engine bay "shine"...and it's an oil base if i'm not mistaken...not water based...
 

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I've always started my engines up just enough to take the chill off the components, not even near hot. Then i spray a mild degreaser all over and spray off. Been doing this for 30 years and you can eat off any of my engines. I use a tire leaner or armor all on the hoses and contact electrical cleaner on the electrical components and pulleys.
 

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The key is to use a mild degreaser, not the heavy duty stuff, which will dry out rubber components. Easy enough to wipe down the hoses afterwards, but once that stuff soaks ino your belts they're gonna squeal until you replace them.
 

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Here is the stuff I use and it works great. Just spray a little on the engine, preferably a cold engine. Let it run for 20 minutes. Lift the hood and everything is shiney. It is water based and does not attract dust. A little goes a long way. If you too much on the engine, it will be white, just wipe off the excess with a rag and you are good to go.

http://showcardetail.com/ShowCarProducts.html

Go to the bottom of the page to "Show Car Dressing". It can be used on more than just the engine bay. It does not hurt any electronics. Attached is a picture of the engine bay in my Shelby.
 

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Never warm the engine to spray water on it. Bad idea.

I use a power washer on very light pressure, spraying straight down, never sideways, after letting a strong degreaser soak for 5-10 mins.
So what about driving to a remote place (so then its already hot) and then driving through water, or mudding --- if I take it through a lot of muddy water, and all that mud and water wash up into the engine compartment (I'm thinking about the Edmunds video where they show the Raptor's engine bay caked with mud) will that cause the same type of damage? Or does water coming in from the bottom not the same as it coming in from the top (like a hose). This sounds like a smart ass question, but really it isn't ---- just trying to learn something.
 

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So what about driving to a remote place (so then its already hot) and then driving through water, or mudding --- if I take it through a lot of muddy water, and all that mud and water wash up into the engine compartment (I'm thinking about the Edmunds video where they show the Raptor's engine bay caked with mud) will that cause the same type of damage? Or does water coming in from the bottom not the same as it coming in from the top (like a hose). This sounds like a smart ass question, but really it isn't ---- just trying to learn something.
The bottom is protected by skid plates and such. Submerging the nose of the truck in water is never a good idea. Neither is spraying cold water on a hot engine.

Try spraying cold water onto your patio when it has been baking in the sun all day. See the steam? Now imagine what that will do to your engine block which could be 2 or 3 times hotter.
 

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I went mudding and got the engine pretty dirty, I want to power wash the engine bay but Im not sure what to cover besides the battery, Ive never done this before because Ive never had a vehicle capable of going through mud. What should i cover?
 

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The sure fire solution is to use some kind of cleaner, there are several good ones and then a low pressure spray from a hose.

Now, that being said. I've pressure washed engines before and haven't had an issue. Most dealerships do it to every used car that they get in trade. I think their washers are better than the typical car wash nozzle though. More heat/steam, less water. It's not magic, but it's certainly made me wonder what they're doing or using to make sure that something doesn't get wet that shouldn't be etc.
 

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For those who say don't spray cold water on a hot engine...No sh*t, every-one knows that, that's like saying don't pour cold water into an overheated radiator, unless you want a cracked radiator. The physics behind it are simple, when metal is heated it slowly expands. If you slowly cool it, the metal will slowly contract and everything will be fine, however, if you rapidly cool metal it will crack. Now for the important part...Smith21 said "slightly warm" which is 100% safe. As they say, the devil is in the details. Smith21 is right, that is a great way to clean an engine.
 
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