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Engine is throwing a #8 cylinder misfire... Assuming it’s the plug how much of a pain in the ass is it to reach the 2 plugs!!!
 

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Matt,
Before you do the plug move the coil pack on that cylinder to an easier one to get to. Number 8 should be the rear most cylinder on the driver's side. I'd move the coil pack forward to number 5 or number 1 one the opposite bank. If the code moves, then do the coil pack. If the code stays with number 8 then do the plug, wire, or additional troubleshooting. I've seen things like this before on Fords and each time its been the coil pack. Some additional items to try:

-Seen this so might be worth a try, try extending the spring inside the boot on the coil pack a little bit to see if maybe the cold has shrunk it a little and now the spark has to jump a bigger gap. Somehow the spring gets pushed away from contacting the plug causing a misfire on occasion. I expect Saginaw, MI gets a little cold this time of year.
-Ensure the wire from the coil hasn't worn through from rubbing on metal somewhere. Seen this one too, the wire insulation actually had a groove rubbed into it and the spark would go to ground; don't think we caught it until it burned thru the insulation.

upload_2018-11-27_22-8-59.png


Disregard all the above and do the plug if you've already eliminated all the other possible causes. I haven't done the plugs on my 2014 Raptor yet so don't have much to offer except this extracted from the 2014 Raptor manual:

upload_2018-11-27_22-12-36.png

If you do find it is the plug, you should consider doing all of them. Expensive, I know; but if one is failing how far can the others be behind it. Just a thought. (Actually I was considering purchasing the plugs in sets of four when I get closer to 100,000 miles, just under 60K now.)

If your mechanical skills are questionable or tool set short, it might be better if you paid someone to do this; even more expensive but if they screw something up they pay for it. Be sure to use anti-seize on the plug threads when you put them back in. I like to use a little dielectric grease inside the boot when you slip it over the plugs. Both help with removal at future dates if needed.

Good luck with this,
LZinAZ
 

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upload_2018-12-1_13-38-31.png

Matt,
I was going to include this screenshot in the original response but you seemed to be sure it was number 8 in front of the driver; always a pain to work on the driver's side due to brakes, air filter, etc. The arrow is the front of the truck.

Ruckus08 recommends a nice tool but a Craftsman or other deep 5/8ths will work but it should be a six-point and have the rubber sleeve inside to prevent cracking the insulation on the plug. Don't over tighten the plug; the spec is 106 in. lbs. so just over wrist tight. It's best to have a locking extension too; generally the socket will come off the extension down in the plug well so you'll need a long needle-nose pliers to pull it out. It's all kind of a pain without the right tools.

Don't mean to question a commentee's skills or tool set, just trying to be helpful.

Good luck on this,
LZinAZ
 

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Agree completely LZ. The pliers were actually the main reason I went with the swivel head socket. After removing the passenger side I was done fiddling with the socket and extension. Probably just me whining, but made the drivers side quite a bit easier.
 
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